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Hernando’s Hideaway, Miami Beach (Opening Fall 2018)

Hernando’s Hideaway is a experimental curatorial framework housed within the private residence of curator Gladys-Katherina Hernando in Miami Beach, Florida. The property provides unconventional sites for public presentations of contemporary art: a one-car garage as contemporary gallery and front lawn for sculptural works. Hernando’s Hideaway is distinctively a counter-institutional structure for the display, presentation, and consideration of art and its spaces. The property serves as a unique location for national and international artists to develop their practice and engage in dialogue with the local art community in Miami as well as discover the richness of a city that generally remains on the margins. hernandoshideaway.org

 

 

 

More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles (September 9–October 29, 2017)

September 9–October 29, 2017

JOAN, Los Angeles

Loren Abbate, C. P. Badger, Michael Carter, Manny Castro, Michael Genovese, Marcos Lutyens, Adam D. Miller, Christina Ondrus, Ali Prosch, David Schafer, Katie Shapiro, Astri Swendsrud, Mungo Thomson, and Landon Wiggs

Part I

It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive. –C.W. Leadbeater

Sometimes he saw his real face / And sometimes a stranger at his place / Even the greatest stars find their face in the looking glass. –”The Hall of Mirrors,” Kraftwerk

The darkest place is underneath the lamp. –Chinese proverb

PART II

In his catalogue essay for the exhibition The Spiritual in Art: Abstract Painting, 1980–1985, (1986) at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, curator Maurice Tuchman proposed that early historical abstraction was generated from five elements of the spiritual, which referred to underlying modes of thought –cosmic imagery, vibration, synesthesia, duality, and sacred geometry. More Light proposes new modes of thought such as the transference of language, science, perception, theosophy, and the transcendental. The exhibition presents painting, sculpture, film, and installation engaged with the interstitial spaces of the image-world and the intangible world.

PART III

More Light is an exhibition about perception, about the transmission of language, about storytelling and pithy statements. It is about allegory. It is about awareness of the outside world, and the individual, and a sensitivity to their plights and turmoil. It is about social identity and political power, and how those economies are communicated. It is about multivocality. The artists in the exhibition resist traditional images of the spiritual or the secular in favor of the prismatic and the plural. More Light asks to vanquish the dark in favor of the light for the sake of ourselves and of all others.

More Light is the third in a series of exhibitions organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, including—The White Album (2014), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, and The Elegant Universe (2015), The Pit, Los Angeles—that explore the experiential relationship of art and the perception of the viewer.

Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.

Galería Perdida: I want to blush f**kers, JOAN, Los Angeles, (October 8–November 20, 2016)

October 8–November 20, 2016

Patent drawing for the Hot Pick Comb, Newbern R, July 3, 1973.
Patent drawing for the Hot Pick Comb, Newbern R, July 3, 1973.

Inspired by an unexpected encounter with the display of a French wooden comb from the 15th century at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Galería Perdida will present the project I want to blush, f***ers, a collection of approximately 20 walnut wood hair combs custom mounted onto blush-hued wooden tiles. Galería Perdida deliberately designed each of the combs from techniques  that range from graphic design to tradtional style with a number of them abstracted to the point of illegibility.

As an object, the comb is a utilitarian device that functions without notice in daily life. Its various forms and materials of construction rarely associate the object with its historical value, connection to prestige, or cultural affiliation. Combs were one of the first objects discovered by archaeologists in the tombs of ancient Egypt—dating back about 5,000 years—and their production continued largely in China, Cuba, Mexico, Spain, and the Philippines. The process of making combs by hand required an intense craftsmanship particularly in the cutting of the teeth. It was not until the 18th century that combs were popularized with the development of fabrication techniques, making combs more ornamental and symbols of luxury and high fashion.

The shift in the accessibility of combs as ornate accessories of aesthetic appearance on the body gave the objects greater exclusivity. Currently, these combs exist as artifacts in the collections of many international museum institutions, displayed and contextualized by museological structures.

Galería Perdida was established in Chilchota, Michoacán in 2005. The collective currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Exhibitions include: And Per Se And, Commonwealth and Council, (2016) and Routine Pleasures, MAK Center for Art and Architecture, (2016); Zelda Zonk, Preface Gallery, Paris, (2013); Somos fabricantes de alimentos en cuero and Todo la memoria del mundo, Casa del Lago Juan José Arreola, Mexico City, (2013); Let’s Smell it Together, CUE Foundation, New York, (2013); El carne de burro no es transparente, Luckman Gallery, Los Angeles, (2012); and Matryoshka, Recess Activities, New York, (2011).

Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.

 

JOAN
4300 West Jefferson Boulevard #1
Los Angeles, California 90016
joanlosangeles.org

Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), JOAN, Los Angeles, (October 8–November 20, 2016)

October 8–November 20, 2016

Meeting of Waters confluence between the dark water of the Rio Negro with the sandy-colored Rio Solimões in the Amazon River, Manaus, Brazil. Photo credit: José Caldas/ BrazilPhotos.com / Alamy Stock Photo.
Meeting of Waters confluence between the dark water of the Rio Negro with the sandy-colored Rio Solimões at the Amazon River, Manaus, Brazil. Photo credit: José Caldas/ BrazilPhotos.com / Alamy Stock Photo.

JOAN is pleased to present Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), a delicate and ambitious large-scale installation. Combining the basket weaving patterns of the indigenous Baniwa people, native to the Brazilian Amazon, with satellite images depicting the 900-miles (1,448 kilometers) of the Amazon River from the Manaus Basin (or Port of Manaus) in Brazil to its equatorial drainage point in the Atlantic Ocean, Tossin will exhibit an enormous tapestry whose cuts and weaves evoke the divide between two systems of representation–cultural and ideological—that exist in Manaus itself.

Located within the Amazon rainforest in the Northern region of Brazil, Manaus, the capital city of Amazonas, is situated at the confluence of the Rio Negro (Black River) and the Rio Solimões. The two rivers connect with the Amazon River at the Port of Manaus, where for 3.7 miles (6 kilometers), their nearly black and beige colored waters flow parallel to each other without joining, until the two rivers stream into the Atlantic Ocean.

For her exhibition at JOAN, Tossin weaves the cut strips of the tapestry in opposing directions creating visual breaks in the pattern to depict the physical and political fragmentation of the river and its surroundings. This psychic movement mimics the routes of consumer goods, materials, and people in the region. At the scale of 50 feet long x 4 1/2 feet wide (15.24 meters x 1.37 meters), the piece drapes over the ceiling beams in the gallery and reveals its bilateral construction before curling downwards onto the floor and across the length of the space.

In 1957 Federal Deputy of the Brazilian government Francisco Pereira da Silva (1818–1985) legally amended the city of Manaus into a “Porto Franco” or Free Trade Port, an area where goods and products from the Amazon could be stored. In 1960 the port was designated a Free Trade Zone (ZFM – Zona Franca de Manaus) and by 1967 its surrounding areas were formally extended to 6,200 square miles (16,057 kilometers). This mass deregulation lured foreign business interests with tax incentives, reduced and nearly obliterated laws protecting the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest, and offered an enormity of landmass to commercial, industrial, and agricultural industries.

Currently, Manaus is the headquarters of various consumer production plants, including Apple, Sony, LG, Panasonic, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Honda Motorcycles, Harley-Davidson, and Yamaha Motorcycles, among others. Under the ZFM, the Port of Manaus, with its direct access to the open Atlantic Ocean, is the lifeline of these foreign corporations and a detriment to the Amazon rainforest. The consequences of massive international exchange on the natural and vulnerable corridor of the Amazon River contributes to the deterioration of the rainforest, and severely impacts the habitats of indigenous cultures in the region.

Using terra cotta, the traditional material used by the Baniwa people to make pots, urns, food containers, and other earthenware, Tossin merges these spaces of contradictory and contentious terrian with objects cast from a selection of mass produced products in the region. In contrast to the fragmentation of the tapestry, the terra cotta melds a fundamental material of an ancient Amazonian cultural history with replicas of consumer objects, making visible the production and circulation of consumer goods while stripping them of their intended function.

Clarissa Tossin earned her BFA in 2000 from Fundação Armando Álvares Penteado in São Paulo, Brazil, and her MFA in 2009 from California Institute of the Arts, Los Angeles. She was awarded a Residency Fellowship at Fundação Joaquim Nabuco in Recife, Brazil, (2015), and an Emerging Artist Fellowship from the California Community Foundation, (2014). She participated in Artpace, an international artist-in-residence program in San Antonio, Texas, where she developed and exhibited the multimedia installation Brasília, Cars, Pools and Other Modernities, (2013), which was later included in Made in L.A. 2014, (2014), at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Some of her solo exhibitions include the Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, (2015); Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles, (2015); Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo, (2014); Blaffer Art Museum, University of Houston, (2013); and Sicardi Gallery, Houston, (2013). She has participated in group exhibitions including, Trans-Americas: A sign, A situation, A concept, Museum London, Ontario, (2016); United States of Latin America, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit, (2015); Unsettled Landscapes, SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico, (2014); Bringing the World into the World, Queens Museum, New York, (2014); and When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco, (2012); among others.

Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters) is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.

JOAN

4300 West Jefferson Boulevard #1
Los Angeles, California 90016
joanlosangeles.org

Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel, JOAN, Los Angeles, (June 18–July 24, 2016)

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Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel
June 18–July 24, 2016

JOAN is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel. For the duration of the exhibition, the gallery will be open Friday – Saturday, 2pm–8pm, and Sunday, 12pm–6pm. Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

Nick Bastis (b. 1985) has exhibited at the XII Baltic Triennial; Cartoon Physics, Kerstin Engholm, Vienna; Regards, Chicago; and Catherine Bastide, Brussels.

Nick Raffel (b. 1982) has exhibited at Pied-a-terre, San Francisco. Raffel lives in Chicago, Illinois.

JOAN is a not-for-profit space for talks, performances, screenings, solo projects, and vitrine shows with a focus on emerging and under-recognized artists. JOAN is co-founded by Summer Guthery, Gladys-Katherina Hernando, and Rebecca Matalon.

JOAN
4300 West Jefferson Boulevard #1
Los Angeles, California 90016
joanlosangeles.org

The Elegant Universe, The Pit, Los Angeles (April 12–May 24, 2015)

The Elegant Universe

Olivia Booth, Rod Fahmian, Sonja Gerdes, and Nora Shields

April 12–May 24, 2015 at The Pit, Los Angeles.

The Pit, 918 Ruberta Avenue, Glendale, California, 91201

If a shadow is a two-dimensional projection of a three dimensional world, then the three dimensional world as we know it is the projection of the four-dimensional universe. –Marcel Duchamp

The Pit presents The Elegant Universe a show of new sculptures by Olivia Booth, Rod Fahmian, Sonja Gerdes, and Nora Shields. Inspired by the scientific concept of string theory, The Elegant Universe fragments the linear, narrative methods of seeing in an exploration of dimensionality as form. Through visual fragmentation and the physical navigation of space, The Elegant Universe creates a framework for the disruption and contemplation of perception, potentializing dimension as a concept beyond our immediate recognition.

Inspired by the book of the same name, The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene explores the history and future of scientific string theory as connecting the universe through microscopic loops of energy lying deep within the heart of matter. Greene devised a theory that postulates the existence of extra dimensions of space. Instead of the usual four dimensions, he determined that there must be ten spatial dimensions and one dimension of time to allow for a consistently defined string theory. The theory explains that we do not perceive these extra dimensions because they are “curled up” or “compactified,” and hence not noticeable.

The construction of three dimensional space is composed of the materiality of the world. This frame of space is physically experienced and considered through the a specific, predetermined vocabulary of terms. Primarily through the use of sculpture, the artists use materials and methods that explore ideas of transparency, architecture, energy, and theatricality. The Elegant Universe proposes that a disruption of space may challenge conventions of interaction and understanding to allow for the subtle interrogation of the intangible.

The Elegant Universe is curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando. A publication accompanies the exhibition and includes texts by Adam D. Miller and the Curator.

Olivia Booth lives in Los Angeles; Rod Fahmian lives in Los Angeles, California; Sonja Gerdes lives in Berlin, Germany; and Nora Sheilds lives in Los Angeles.

 

 

Entropic Relations, Part 1 & 2: Rod Fahmian & Zaid Yousef, Riverside, CA (November 2014)

Entropic Relations Part 1 & 2, Curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Part 1: Rod Fahmian, Saturday, November 22, 2014, 7 – 10 pm

Part 2: Zaid Yousef, Saturday, November 29, 2014, 7 – 10 pm

Entropic Relations is a two-part exhibition featuring solo projects by Rod Fahmian and Zaid Yousef. Presented in the artists’ studio, each will create an installation and limited edition artwork in the space for one night. The individual projects are connected by the dynamics of the studio as well as in the shared discourses that comprise the artists’ work. Fahmian and Yousef explore ideas of order and disorder, construction and destruction, with a focus on entropy as the uniting factor. Entropic Relations seeks to connect these symbolic opposites through the contrasting material and conceptual elements that comprise the work. Entropic Relations will explore the natural and the constructed in relation to human interaction and experience.

The term entropy is a term typically used to describe the amount of order, disorder, or chaos (energy dispersion) in a thermodynamic system. In other words, how close a system is to equilibrium or verging on disorder. This term has also been used to describe the rejection of convention ideas in art making in favor of form over content. The idea of entropy is a reaction to technology and its inevitable collapse. It is an exploration of the common and visible objects and materials that surround us, in order to be filled by what according to artist Robert Smithson is the experience of “both past and future..placed into an objective present.”

Inspired by the composition of the urban landscape and the influence of contemporary subcultures, Rod Fahmian explores line, spatiality, and form in his sculptures. His works are formally structured by minimalist aesthetics and combine with aggressive undertones to subvert the act of looking. In part one of the exhibition, Fahmian will present an installation of three structures built to the dimensions of a doorway or passageway that use basic building materials such as concrete, metal, and glass. Through the familiarity of scale, slightly larger than the human body, the sculptures are inverted to actualize the presence of negative space. Rather than an opening, the sculptures are a barrier. They explore the antagonistic qualities of fabricated obstacles to disrupt and restrict the ideologically liberated experience of physical space.

Taken from various excursions into the desert, Zaid Yousef excavates natural black obsidian from giant rocks mere steps away from civilization. Obsidian is a naturally formed volcanic glass that is hard and brittle allowing it to fracture into sharp edges, which were used by many early cultures as cutting and piercing tools. In the act or performance of excavating these materials, Yousef utilizes aspects of geology and archeology to dislocate this natural element into the realm of the man-made. For the second part of the exhibition, Yousef will present three categories of collected specimens as an installation. Raw obsidian, welded extrusions, and modified specimens are displaced from their original locations and organized into a field of objects on the floor. Relocated into the realm of displayed objects, the specimens are deprived of their primary function as minerals. In this second site, the stones are transformed into basic forms that propose the idea of truth as a subjective experience. Entropic Relations is curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

Both events took place at 2023 Chicago Avenue, Suite B22, Riverside, California 92507.

Installation views of Part 1 and Part 2 follow below:

 

Part 1: Rod Fahmian

Part 2: Zaid Yousef

The White Album, Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles (July 19–August 16, 2014)

The White Album, organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Richard Telles, Los Angeles

July 19–August 16, 2014

Richard Telles Fine Art is pleased to announce The White Album, a group show curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando featuring nineteen Los-Angeles-based artists. The exhibition will present contemporary painting, video, sculpture, and performance that engages with the search for the transcendental in California. Influenced by quintessential aspects and industries of Los Angeles – the landscape, fashion, porn, mysticism, Hollywood, and remnants of the burnt out 60s –The White Album focuses on works that explore ideas of alchemy, animism, vitalism, magic, corporeal transformation, and wonder. These concepts are positioned together to generate a connection that exists outside of ourselves, in alternative modes of consciousness. 

Inspired by the book and essay of the same name by writer Joan Didion, The White Album creates a series of subtexts that relate and play with one another in the attempt to recreate the formation of narratives and the sensation of the intangible magic that inspires these artist’s works. In her essay, Didion writes about the end of the 60s and explores various topics about California, from the opening of the lavish Getty Villa, the emergence of the Women’s Movement, and the importance of water in the desert, and invisible politics. Today there is another ending: the lack of grand narratives, the proliferation of images in culture, and the loss of the imagination of the future. Yet artists have returned to the exploration of the sublime and the metaphysical aspects of lived experience. Like the book, the exhibition focuses on Los Angeles artists dealing with a variety of subjects linked to the intangible qualities of the mystical and transcendental. 

The exhibition includes Christopher Badger, Kristin Beinner James, Eduardo Consuegra, Alika Cooper, Dan Finsel, Mark Hagen, Daniel Ingroff, Barry Johnston, James Krone, Max Maslansky, Dianna Molzan, Laurie Nye, Fay Ray,  Amanda Ross-Ho, Katherine Ryan, Semi-Tropic Spiritualists, Owen Schmit, Mary Weatherford, and Jonas Wood.

A publication will be produced on the occasion of the exhibition with texts by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Lia Trinka-Browner, and Itza Vilaboy, and available for the duration of the show. On the evening of the opening there will be a performance by Semi-Tropic Spiritualists at 6:30 pm sharp.

DOWNLOAD CATALOG PDF


Richard Telles Fine Art

7380 Beverly Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90036

tellesfineart.com

Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 am – 5pm


Letters from the Field, Berlin (August 22–26, 2012)

Letters from the Field
22–26 August 2012

Letters from the Field is a group exhibition and publication curated by the nine residents of the Node Center for Curatorial Studies 2012 summer program. Letters from the Field features work by twenty artists currently working in Berlin. The resident curators have invited artists to respond to six contemporary topics that address histories, futures, and fictions. The form of the artists’ responses range from written content to video, painting, sculpture and performance.

Functioning as a conceptual framework to the exhibition, the publication contains artists’ contributions and essays by curators in a series of eight chapters. The book is presented in a malleable format that can be edited by the viewer, with a chapter left partially blank for additional responses.These assembled elements attempt to reveal the process of the production of ideas and critical methodologies. Through collaboration and correspondence, Letters from the Field is an experiment in exposing what our present is.

The participating artists are Heba Amin, Stephan Backes, Megan Cotts, Regina De Miguel, Kate Hers, Sharon Houkema, Klaas Hübner, Michiel Huijben, Stine Marie Jacobsen, Lindsay Lawson, Ruth Le Gear, François Martig, Alex Martinis Roe, Lynda Amer Meziane, Nicolas Puyjalon, Annika Rixen, Rebecca Smith, Aiko Tezuka, Ciarán Walsh, and Ylva Westerlund.

Letters from the Field is curated by Lee Foley, Catherine Gomersall, Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Sinejan Kılıç, Maeve Mulrennan, Iohanna Nicenboim, Marília Pasculli, Dunja Rmandić, and Tanya Toft.

The exhibition was produced by the Node Center for Curatorial Studies, Berlin.

Link to PDF of catalogue essay “What Our Present Is: Presence of Mind in Cultural Production” © Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Vernissage: Wednesday 22 August 2012, 7–10pm
Visiting Hours: Thursday–Sunday, 2–8pm
Atelierhof Kreuzberg
Schleiermacherstraße 31–37
10961 Berlin, Germany

All images © Laura Gianetti

Link to entire PhotoSet on Flickr