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Upcoming: Las Lenguas, BBQLA, Los Angeles (June 9–July 19, 2018)

Las Lenguas

BBQLA, Los Angeles

June 9–July 19, 2018

The Spanish word lengua means both tongue (speech) and language (system of communication), it refers to the muscular organ that is part of the mouth, the biological element of the body that permits the transmission of dialogue. Tongues are our bodies and our bodies are a tongue. There is no speech without the tongue and no language without tongues.

A tongue is bitten, silenced, vocalized. It can bless or it can curse. The tongue can taste and swallow, it can kiss and it can lick. The tongue can figuratively heal or it can burn. Tongues are cut as a form of punishment, tortured for betrayal or malace. Certain cultures consume the tongue of cows as part of their cuisine. In others, tongues are used for brujeria (witchcraft) and magic spells. Tongues can complete sentences or remain silent. When their purpose is for derogatory speech, malas lenguas (bad tongues) is the turn of phrase. Though the tongue itself remains relatively concealed inside the mouth, autonomic like the breath, generally unnoticed, it quietly and unassumingly can destroy people and nations with its enormous, self-effacing power.

Las Lenguas is an exploration of the potential languages of the body, presenting works that consider the representation of the figure by way of its inaudible gestures of expression, from the tacit to the implicit. Lenguas demand sensitive observation, if not perception, to recognize the variety of its semblances. Lenguas ceaselessly shape shift– in the nuance of expression from a lover or a stranger, from the alienation of a foreign language, or the failure of translation–as the voice and the body seek distinguishable codes of associations. Truth beyond the territory of one’s own lengua is unknown. Lenguas reveal or conceal the mysterious shapes and sounds that exist in the interior and exterior worlds made by the body.

Las Lenguas features work by Manny Castro, Raúl Guerrero, Alan Gutierrez, Yaron Michael Hakim, Shaun Johnson, Sofía Londoño, Jesse Mockrin, Nora Riggs, Ellen Schafer, and Hiejin Yoo. Las Lenguas is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

BBQLA

2315 Jesse Street

Los Angeles, California 90023

bbqla.net

Image: Mahavidya Bagalamukhi Pulls The ‘Evil Tongue’, c. 1850, Kalighat painting on paper, source unknown.

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Hernando’s Hideaway, Miami Beach (Opening Spring/Fall 2018)

Hernando’s Hideaway is a space for contemporary art located in and around a one-car garage on Miami Beach and is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

w: hernandoshideaway.org

e: HHHQMB@gmail.com

ig: @hernandoshdwy

fb: @hernandoshideawaymb

CLICK HERE to join the mailing list!

 

Garage under construction, March 31, 2018.

Garage under construction, March 31, 2018.

Garage under construction, March 31, 2018.

Garage under construction, March 31, 2018.

 

More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles (September 2017)

September 9–October 29, 2017

JOAN, Los Angeles

Loren Abbate, C. P. Badger, Michael Carter, Manny Castro, Michael Genovese, Marcos Lutyens, Adam D. Miller, Christina Ondrus, Ali Prosch, David Schafer, Katie Shapiro, Astri Swendsrud, Mungo Thomson, and Landon Wiggs

Part I

It is one of the commonest of mistakes to consider that the limit of our power of perception is also the limit of all there is to perceive. –C.W. Leadbeater

Sometimes he saw his real face / And sometimes a stranger at his place / Even the greatest stars find their face in the looking glass. –”The Hall of Mirrors,” Kraftwerk

The darkest place is underneath the lamp. –Chinese proverb

PART II

In his catalogue essay for the exhibition The Spiritual in Art: Abstract Painting, 1980–1985, (1986) at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, curator Maurice Tuchman proposed that early historical abstraction was generated from five elements of the spiritual, which referred to underlying modes of thought –cosmic imagery, vibration, synesthesia, duality, and sacred geometry. More Light proposes new modes of thought such as the transference of language, science, perception, theosophy, and the transcendental. The exhibition presents painting, sculpture, film, and installation engaged with the interstitial spaces of the image-world and the intangible world.

PART III

More Light is an exhibition about perception, about the transmission of language, about storytelling and pithy statements. It is about allegory. It is about awareness of the outside world, and the individual, and a sensitivity to their plights and turmoil. It is about social identity and political power, and how those economies are communicated. It is about multivocality. The artists in the exhibition resist traditional images of the spiritual or the secular in favor of the prismatic and the plural. More Light asks to vanquish the dark in favor of the light for the sake of ourselves and of all others.

More Light is the third in a series of exhibitions organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, including—The White Album (2014), Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, and The Elegant Universe (2015), The Pit, Los Angeles—that explore the experiential relationship of art and the perception of the viewer.

Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.
Installation view of More Light, JOAN, Los Angeles, September 9–November 12, 2017, Photo: Joshua White Photography.

Galería Perdida: I want to blush f**kers, JOAN, Los Angeles, (October 2016)

October 8, 2016 – November 20, 2016

Patent drawing for the Hot Pick Comb, Newbern R, July 3, 1973.
Patent drawing for the Hot Pick Comb, Newbern R, July 3, 1973.

Inspired by an unexpected encounter with the display of a French wooden comb from the 15th century at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Galería Perdida will present the project I want to blush, f***ers, a collection of approximately 20 walnut wood hair combs custom mounted onto blush-hued wooden tiles. Galería Perdida deliberately designed each of the combs from techniques  that range from graphic design to tradtional style with a number of them abstracted to the point of illegibility.

As an object, the comb is a utilitarian device that functions without notice in daily life. Its various forms and materials of construction rarely associate the object with its historical value, connection to prestige, or cultural affiliation. Combs were one of the first objects discovered by archaeologists in the tombs of ancient Egypt—dating back about 5,000 years—and their production continued largely in China, Cuba, Mexico, Spain, and the Philippines. The process of making combs by hand required an intense craftsmanship particularly in the cutting of the teeth. It was not until the 18th century that combs were popularized with the development of fabrication techniques, making combs more ornamental and symbols of luxury and high fashion.

The shift in the accessibility of combs as ornate accessories of aesthetic appearance on the body gave the objects greater exclusivity. Currently, these combs exist as artifacts in the collections of many international museum institutions, displayed and contextualized by museological structures.

Galería Perdida was established in Chilchota, Michoacán in 2005. The collective currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Exhibitions include: And Per Se And, Commonwealth and Council, (2016) and Routine Pleasures, MAK Center for Art and Architecture, (2016); Zelda Zonk, Preface Gallery, Paris, (2013); Somos fabricantes de alimentos en cuero and Todo la memoria del mundo, Casa del Lago Juan José Arreola, Mexico City, (2013); Let’s Smell it Together, CUE Foundation, New York, (2013); El carne de burro no es transparente, Luckman Gallery, Los Angeles, (2012); and Matryoshka, Recess Activities, New York, (2011).

Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Galería Perdida: I want to blush, f***ers, 2016, JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.

 

JOAN
4300 West Jefferson Boulevard #1
Los Angeles, California 90016
joanlosangeles.org

Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), JOAN, Los Angeles, (October 2016)

October 8, 2016 – November 20, 2016

Meeting of Waters confluence between the dark water of the Rio Negro with the sandy-colored Rio Solimões in the Amazon River, Manaus, Brazil. Photo credit: José Caldas/ BrazilPhotos.com / Alamy Stock Photo.
Meeting of Waters confluence between the dark water of the Rio Negro with the sandy-colored Rio Solimões at the Amazon River, Manaus, Brazil. Photo credit: José Caldas/ BrazilPhotos.com / Alamy Stock Photo.

JOAN is pleased to present Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), a delicate and ambitious large-scale installation. Combining the basket weaving patterns of the indigenous Baniwa people, native to the Brazilian Amazon, with satellite images depicting the 900-miles (1,448 kilometers) of the Amazon River from the Manaus Basin (or Port of Manaus) in Brazil to its equatorial drainage point in the Atlantic Ocean, Tossin will exhibit an enormous tapestry whose cuts and weaves evoke the divide between two systems of representation–cultural and ideological—that exist in Manaus itself.

Located within the Amazon rainforest in the Northern region of Brazil, Manaus, the capital city of Amazonas, is situated at the confluence of the Rio Negro (Black River) and the Rio Solimões. The two rivers connect with the Amazon River at the Port of Manaus, where for 3.7 miles (6 kilometers), their nearly black and beige colored waters flow parallel to each other without joining, until the two rivers stream into the Atlantic Ocean.

For her exhibition at JOAN, Tossin weaves the cut strips of the tapestry in opposing directions creating visual breaks in the pattern to depict the physical and political fragmentation of the river and its surroundings. This psychic movement mimics the routes of consumer goods, materials, and people in the region. At the scale of 50 feet long x 4 1/2 feet wide (15.24 meters x 1.37 meters), the piece drapes over the ceiling beams in the gallery and reveals its bilateral construction before curling downwards onto the floor and across the length of the space.

In 1957 Federal Deputy of the Brazilian government Francisco Pereira da Silva (1818–1985) legally amended the city of Manaus into a “Porto Franco” or Free Trade Port, an area where goods and products from the Amazon could be stored. In 1960 the port was designated a Free Trade Zone (ZFM – Zona Franca de Manaus) and by 1967 its surrounding areas were formally extended to 6,200 square miles (16,057 kilometers). This mass deregulation lured foreign business interests with tax incentives, reduced and nearly obliterated laws protecting the deforestation of the Amazon rainforest, and offered an enormity of landmass to commercial, industrial, and agricultural industries.

Currently, Manaus is the headquarters of various consumer production plants, including Apple, Sony, LG, Panasonic, Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Honda Motorcycles, Harley-Davidson, and Yamaha Motorcycles, among others. Under the ZFM, the Port of Manaus, with its direct access to the open Atlantic Ocean, is the lifeline of these foreign corporations and a detriment to the Amazon rainforest. The consequences of massive international exchange on the natural and vulnerable corridor of the Amazon River contributes to the deterioration of the rainforest, and severely impacts the habitats of indigenous cultures in the region.

Using terra cotta, the traditional material used by the Baniwa people to make pots, urns, food containers, and other earthenware, Tossin merges these spaces of contradictory and contentious terrian with objects cast from a selection of mass produced products in the region. In contrast to the fragmentation of the tapestry, the terra cotta melds a fundamental material of an ancient Amazonian cultural history with replicas of consumer objects, making visible the production and circulation of consumer goods while stripping them of their intended function.

Clarissa Tossin earned her BFA in 2000 from Fundação Armando Álvares Penteado in São Paulo, Brazil, and her MFA in 2009 from California Institute of the Arts, Los Angeles. She was awarded a Residency Fellowship at Fundação Joaquim Nabuco in Recife, Brazil, (2015), and an Emerging Artist Fellowship from the California Community Foundation, (2014). She participated in Artpace, an international artist-in-residence program in San Antonio, Texas, where she developed and exhibited the multimedia installation Brasília, Cars, Pools and Other Modernities, (2013), which was later included in Made in L.A. 2014, (2014), at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Some of her solo exhibitions include the Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach, (2015); Samuel Freeman Gallery, Los Angeles, (2015); Galeria Luisa Strina, São Paulo, (2014); Blaffer Art Museum, University of Houston, (2013); and Sicardi Gallery, Houston, (2013). She has participated in group exhibitions including, Trans-Americas: A sign, A situation, A concept, Museum London, Ontario, (2016); United States of Latin America, Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit, (2015); Unsettled Landscapes, SITE Santa Fe, New Mexico, (2014); Bringing the World into the World, Queens Museum, New York, (2014); and When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, CCA Wattis Institute, San Francisco, (2012); among others.

Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters) is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin: Encontro das Águas (Meeting of Waters), 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Installation view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.
Detail view of Clarissa Tossin, Zona Franca de Manaus, 2016, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photo by Jeff McLane.

JOAN

4300 West Jefferson Boulevard #1
Los Angeles, California 90016
joanlosangeles.org

Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel, JOAN, Los Angeles, (June 2016)

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Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel
June 18, 2016 – July 24, 2016

JOAN is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel. For the duration of the exhibition, the gallery will be open Friday – Saturday, 2pm–8pm, and Sunday, 12pm–6pm. Nick Bastis and Nick Raffel is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

Nick Bastis (b. 1985) has exhibited at the XII Baltic Triennial; Cartoon Physics, Kerstin Engholm, Vienna; Regards, Chicago; and Catherine Bastide, Brussels.

Nick Raffel (b. 1982) has exhibited at Pied-a-terre, San Francisco. Raffel lives in Chicago, Illinois.

JOAN is a not-for-profit space for talks, performances, screenings, solo projects, and vitrine shows with a focus on emerging and under-recognized artists. JOAN is co-founded by Summer Guthery, Gladys-Katherina Hernando, and Rebecca Matalon.

JOAN
4300 West Jefferson Boulevard #1
Los Angeles, California 90016
joanlosangeles.org

Jill Spector: The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, (September 2015)

September 12 – July 11, 2015

Vitrine, JOAN, Los Angeles

In an installation of the JOAN vitrine, Los Angeles artist Jill Spector composes sketches and templates for the imagination of an idealized theater space. Inspired by a similar proposal for her installation Cutlets III included in the publication SchindlerLab.org, this piece explores themes of practice and theatricality through various unrealized forms. The vitrine is transformed into a stage made of wood and marble, while templates for lighting allude to a darkened set. Her soft and hard sculptures hint at a dance floor where the movement of invisible bodies and hands exist on a floating platform; sculptures that are also an amphitheater.

Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0004-copy-819x1024 Installation view of Jill Spector, “The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray,” JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0007-copy-1024x683Installation view of Jill Spector, “The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray,” JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0011-copy-1024x683 Installation view of Jill Spector, The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0018-copy-1024x683 Installation view of Jill Spector, The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0021-copy-1024x683 Installation view of Jill Spector, The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0023-copy-682x1024 Installation view of Jill Spector, The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0032-copy-1024x683 Installation view of Jill Spector, The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0041-copy-1024x683Installation view of Jill Spector, The Editor’s President: Models and Mock-Ups for Elaine May, Nora Kaye, and Eileen Gray, JOAN, Los Angeles, Photos by Joshua White.

Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, JOAN, Los Angeles, (July 2015)

July 11 – Sunday, August 9, 2015
JOAN, Los Angeles
The Outdoor Type (Extended version) by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

In her book “The Power of Display,” Mary Anne Staniszewski frames the importance of exhibition design as a total whole that acknowledges the vitality, historicity, and the time-and-site-bound character of all aspects of culture. Historically, installation design as a medium and historic category remains a relatively overlooked consideration, holding in its place the significance of discrete objects of art. The fundamental impermanence of Mark Hagen’s installation The Outdoor Type at JOAN is a multilayered manifestation of presence versus absence in perceptual experience to explore the ephemeral nature of exhibitions.The centerpiece of the installation is Ramada JOAN (2015), which is inspired by the temporary or permanent shelters called a ramada – derived from the Spanish word rama meaning “branch” – they were originally built with a roof without walls and constructed with branches or natural materials by aboriginal Americans living in the Southwestern United States. For his installation at JOAN and the fifth iteration of the structures he calls “space frames,” Hagen liberates the architecture of the ramada from today’s conventional civic and corporate zones (bus stops, etc.) and relocates them within their aspirational history, traditionally a means for achieving a democratized, architectural nomadism.

Hagen’s Ramada JOAN, is a modular, reconfigurable, unfixed, and incomplete space that can easily expand and contract in time. By retaining the flexible nature of the space frame itself – a series of nodes, pins, and various sized brackets – Hagen potentialities future iterations, additions, subtractions, and/or enhancements by creating a structure with the ability to infinitely repeat itself or take on different forms based on its various locations.

In Ramada JOAN, Hagen’s space frame is composed as a platform with columns, a thatch canopy roof made of metal scraps laid upon each other, contains sails (described later), and displays an unusual object. Rising near the center of the modular grid is a pedestal sprayed with layers of gray papercrete onto its surface. Presented on the top of this pedestal is a non-human cultural artifact, a Neanderthal stone tool that was found in a rock shelter – a shallow cave with protection from the sky but generally without walls – in Caen, France. Approximately dated about 60,000 years old, it predates homo sapiens’ arrival to modern day Europe, or in other words, it predates the realm of what is considered to be the realm of homo sapiens’ cultural production. The intervention of object/artifact into the installation of the space frame conjures the literal use-value of the tool from its original time but goes further to imply the physical, albeit conceptual, act of striking and puncturing the sculpture to build it up into a tactile structure/presence that suggests another democratization, that of the idea of culture. Outside of our current era, archeology and its physical, tangible, empirical evidence suggests a reality beyond the present moment.

As the viewer walks around the expanse of the space frame, there is the addition of two titanium anodized and etched panels, or sails, as the artist calls them, that contain opposing die-cut diagonal lines that with movement occasionally align to create additional shapes and patterns. The two sails are particularly striking for the intense rainbow effect created by Hagen’s manipulation of oxidation processes and electricity which determine the formal qualities of his work. Both the sails and the final element of The Outdoor Type – the inclusion of a horizontal format pattern painting – are inspired by the accordion folding security screens found throughout Los Angeles’s commercial and industrial spaces. These screens which are fabricated to block and protect yet retain accessibility are used by Hagen to enhance spacial and temporal specificity amongst the viewer. The intensive properties of voltage, acidity, heat, light, viscosity, and gravity drive generate continuums and gradations about vision and looking, but also about blindness and mystery.

Not only are these anodized titanium pieces are about vision and color, they integrate the phenomena of natural color while highlighting the limitations of perceptual experience. For example, the light at the blue end of the color spectrum does not travel the whole distance from the sun to us, making the sky blue. This can also be illustrated in considering the subjective visual perception of an individual viewer whose ability to perceive color may be limited to the various spectral colors – violet, blue, green, yellow, orange, and red – less than 1 % of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Rather than making the space frame Ramada JOAN a temporal structure or model for viewing an artifact, the impenetrable structure with its repetitive patterns made anachronistically, Hagen foregrounds the illusive singular subjectivity of all participants, from viewer to artist, in order to create a new, expanded vision. Hagen transforms Ramada JOAN into realm of possibility, perhaps even of something else which lacks specific terms or categories. But how do you change terms without creating new ones?

In the well-known parable “On Exactitude and Science” by Jorge Luis Borges, the author describes the story of cartographers asked to create a map of a nameless empire in an equal 1:1 scale. The map became so large that it coincided point by point with every area of the imaginary provinces and their vast landscapes. Though it was considered perfect in the field of Geography, the 1:1 scale of the two-dimensional map could never depict the cultural layers of being in a place or the disparate versions of that experience. Considering the Cartesian grids and mapping that influence Hagen, there is another aspect to be noted, the terra incognita, unmarked expanses which remain on old world maps – oceans never crossed, coastlines unexplored. Like the flint artifact displayed as a scientific or archaeological object in an installation method never to be found in a Natural History Museum, Hagen evokes content within the space frame and around the space of JOAN. Another space he creates is the completion of the parable. No representation is complete and every representation is partial, or else it would not be representation. It signifies also that the cartographers knew the limits of the map and awareness of ignorance is not just ignorance; it’s awareness of knowledge’s limits.

 

Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0957-1024x684 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0961-1024x683Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0966-1024x683 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0967-1024x683 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0969-1024x683 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0971-683x1024 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0972-683x1024 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0973-683x1024 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0975-683x1024 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0976-683x1024 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0979-683x1024 Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-0980-683x1024Installation and detail views of Mark Hagen, The Outdoor Type, 2015, JOAN, Los Angeles, photos by Joshua White. 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The Elegant Universe, The Pit, Los Angeles (April 2015)

The Elegant Universe

Olivia Booth, Rod Fahmian, Sonja Gerdes, and Nora Shields

April 12 – May 24, 2015 at The Pit, Los Angeles.

The Pit, 918 Ruberta Avenue, Glendale, California, 91201

If a shadow is a two-dimensional projection of a three dimensional world, then the three dimensional world as we know it is the projection of the four-dimensional universe. –Marcel Duchamp

The Pit presents The Elegant Universe a show of new sculptures by Olivia Booth, Rod Fahmian, Sonja Gerdes, and Nora Shields. Inspired by the scientific concept of string theory, The Elegant Universe fragments the linear, narrative methods of seeing in an exploration of dimensionality as form. Through visual fragmentation and the physical navigation of space, The Elegant Universe creates a framework for the disruption and contemplation of perception, potentializing dimension as a concept beyond our immediate recognition.

Inspired by the book of the same name, The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene explores the history and future of scientific string theory as connecting the universe through microscopic loops of energy lying deep within the heart of matter. Greene devised a theory that postulates the existence of extra dimensions of space. Instead of the usual four dimensions, he determined that there must be ten spatial dimensions and one dimension of time to allow for a consistently defined string theory. The theory explains that we do not perceive these extra dimensions because they are “curled up” or “compactified,” and hence not noticeable.

The construction of three dimensional space is composed of the materiality of the world. This frame of space is physically experienced and considered through the a specific, predetermined vocabulary of terms. Primarily through the use of sculpture, the artists use materials and methods that explore ideas of transparency, architecture, energy, and theatricality. The Elegant Universe proposes that a disruption of space may challenge conventions of interaction and understanding to allow for the subtle interrogation of the intangible.

The Elegant Universe is curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando. A publication accompanies the exhibition and includes texts by Adam D. Miller and the Curator.

Olivia Booth lives in Los Angeles; Rod Fahmian lives in Los Angeles, California; Sonja Gerdes lives in Berlin, Germany; and Nora Sheilds lives in Los Angeles.

 

 

Fay Ray, Hanging Sculptures, JOAN, Los Angeles, (April 2015)

April 25 – May 17, 2015
JOAN, Los Angeles

JOAN presents an installation by Los Angeles based artist Fay Ray titled Hanging Sculptures. For the project, Ray constructs a collection of objects and forms which include cast aluminum objects, bored volcanic rocks, chain, wire, and natural materials. The elements are transformed into a floating constellation concentrated in the center of the space. Creating a suspended mass of various textures and materials, Ray’s installation weaves into physical dimensions of the space; floating, balancing, resting, or precariously dangling as it reaches beyond vertical and horizontal limitations into physical space.

Based on the construction of a massive chandelier or kinetic sculpture, Hanging Sculptures recalls the shapes of charm necklaces, oversize jewelry, and the delicate balance of pendulums. These various references suggest the deliberate arrangements of traditional religious imagery, borrowing the symbolism and composition based in the realm of altars, shrines, and pagan worship. The deliberate placement and stark metallic materiality of the installation recalls ideas of devotion, consumption, and desire as seen through the magnified lens of of a large scale installation made specifically for JOAN. Fay Ray: Hanging Sculptures is organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando.

 

Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua WhiteInstallation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.

Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, photo by Joshua White.
Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.
Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White. 

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Detail view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White

Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.

Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.
Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.
Detail view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.
Detail view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.
Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.

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Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua WhitePhoto-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-7097-683x1024

Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-7074-683x1024

Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.Photo-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-7073-683x1024

Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua WhitePhoto-Joshua_White-jwpictures.com-7079-683x1024

Detail view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.

Installation view of Fay Ray "Hanging Sculptures," JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White
Installation view of Fay Ray “Hanging Sculptures,” JOAN, May 2015, photo by Joshua White.

The White Album, Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles (July 2014)

The White Album, organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Richard Telles, Los Angeles

July 19 – August 16, 2014

Richard Telles Fine Art is pleased to announce The White Album, a group show curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando featuring nineteen Los-Angeles-based artists. The exhibition will present contemporary painting, video, sculpture, and performance that engages with the search for the transcendental in California. Influenced by quintessential aspects and industries of Los Angeles – the landscape, fashion, porn, mysticism, Hollywood, and remnants of the burnt out 60s –The White Album focuses on works that explore ideas of alchemy, animism, vitalism, magic, corporeal transformation, and wonder. These concepts are positioned together to generate a connection that exists outside of ourselves, in alternative modes of consciousness. 

Inspired by the book and essay of the same name by writer Joan Didion, The White Album creates a series of subtexts that relate and play with one another in the attempt to recreate the formation of narratives and the sensation of the intangible magic that inspires these artist’s works. In her essay, Didion writes about the end of the 60s and explores various topics about California, from the opening of the lavish Getty Villa, the emergence of the Women’s Movement, and the importance of water in the desert, and invisible politics. Today there is another ending: the lack of grand narratives, the proliferation of images in culture, and the loss of the imagination of the future. Yet artists have returned to the exploration of the sublime and the metaphysical aspects of lived experience. Like the book, the exhibition focuses on Los Angeles artists dealing with a variety of subjects linked to the intangible qualities of the mystical and transcendental. 

The exhibition includes Christopher Badger, Kristin Beinner James, Eduardo Consuegra, Alika Cooper, Dan Finsel, Mark Hagen, Daniel Ingroff, Barry Johnston, James Krone, Max Maslansky, Dianna Molzan, Laurie Nye, Fay Ray,  Amanda Ross-Ho, Katherine Ryan, Semi-Tropic Spiritualists, Owen Schmit, Mary Weatherford, and Jonas Wood.

A publication will be produced on the occasion of the exhibition with texts by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Lia Trinka-Browner, and Itza Vilaboy, and available for the duration of the show. On the evening of the opening there will be a performance by Semi-Tropic Spiritualists at 6:30 pm sharp.

DOWNLOAD CATALOG PDF


Richard Telles Fine Art

7380 Beverly Blvd.

Los Angeles, CA 90036

tellesfineart.com

Gallery hours: Tuesday–Saturday, 11 am – 5pm


For an idea of the desert, Joshua Tree, CA (August 2013)

For an idea of the desert:  Nora Jean Petersen & Fay Ray 

curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

August 31, 2013

It is a vast nature. Sands of former lakes and rivers. A mysterious eternity, the definitions of this arid place are almost unfathomable. Layers build to form new shapes. Entropy and erosion. They reveal time in their imprint, perhaps it was only a moment.

From this distance to the city, surrounded by the warm summer air, let the landscape shore up a temporary dislocation in favor of discovery. Be here now.

A forced perspective finds you, a mirror image recording a landscape, to create an ideal position of vision from a single vantage point. Like a hallucinogenic scene from a 1970s science fiction film, these facets simulate movement, light and shadow in flux, to capture the warped symmetry and sun-scorched surface of the desert earth.

What are the codes and signs of the medium? Do the historical echos reach these public lands that hands have barely touched? Can these objects reach for the sky like Joshua or the trees just outside?

The Cahuilla Native Americans used the leaves of the Yucca brevifolia to weave baskets and sandals. Now there are only shapes and trails made by other hands, shadows of bodies lay beside the reversed imprints of natural objects. Monochromatic blackness of form and texture, the art of ritualized behavior.

For an idea of the desert these works collide. They reach from their origin in the city, activated by the howling wind, the concentrated particles of dust, a wandering eye, a beating heart, or a racing mind.

Neptune at opposition.

The waning moon will laugh tonight.

August 31, 2013, Shangrila, Joshua Tree

* * *

Nora Jean Petersen received her MFA from Art Center College of Art and Design and her BA from Sarah Lawrence College. She has exhibited at China Art Objects, Los Angeles; Karen Lovegrove Gallery, Los Angeles; Galerie Nomadenoase, Hamburg; and at the Santa Monica Museum of Art, Santa Monica, among others.

Fay Ray received her MFA from Columbia University and her BFA from Otis College of Art and Design. She has exhibited at various institutions and galleries including Aran Cravey Gallery, Venice; Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles; LAXART, Los Angeles; Gagosian Gallery, New York, NY; and El Museo del Barrio, New York, among others.

All photos © Joel Woodman

INFO about SHANGRILA 2013: Burrito Deluxe, Joshua Tree, California

Organized by Steven Bankhead and Jesse Benson

August 30 – September 1

List of Participants:

Rhiannon Aarons
Amy Radio
Animal Charm
Merwin Belin
Big Girls
MC Sky Burchard
Michelle Chong
Ted Byrnes and Nick Deyoe
Justin Cole
Greg Lenczycki
Alan Nakagawa
AJ Collins
Molly Corey
Mark Desiderio
DJ Debbie Downer
Earth Like Planets
Elephant
Elephant
Alex Becerra
Diana-Sofia Estrada
John Hogan
Sarah Peterson
Guan Rong
Women vs. Children
Thor Evensen
DJ Mark X Farina
Quinn Gomez-Heitzeberg & Astri Swendsrud
Hannah Greely
Daniel Handal
David Hendren
Gladys-Katherina Hernando
Nora Jean Petersen
Fay Ray
Chas Higginbottom
Cannon Hudson
Malisa Humphrey
Ricardo Ibarra
Natalie Jones
Bridget Kane
Farrah Karapetian
Becky Koblick
Jamie Isenstein
Sonia Leimer
Faris McReynolds
Jessica Minckley
Joshua Nathanson
Davida Nemeroff
Net Shaker
Bret Nicely
D’Ette Nogle
Tom Norris
One Finger Riot
Shalini Patel
Josh Peters
Renee Petropoulos
Ben Pruskin
Chadwick Rantanen
Mark Roeder
Svetlana Romanova
Asha Schechter
Elana Scherr
Nicolas Shake
Summercamp’s ProjectProject presents:
Inside Job – with Fatima Hoang
Supper
The Softest Handshake
DJ Jan Tumlir
Torbjorn Vejvi
Chris Wilder
Taylor Zepeda
Rodd Zinberg
 
1030 Shangri La Lane Joshua Tree, California 92252
 
site hosted by Drew Dunlap

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Danielle Adair & Natalie Häusler, Infernoesque, Berlin (July 2013)

July 19, 2013 

Danielle Adair & Natalie Häusler curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Los Angeles

The exhibition of Danielle Adair and Natalie Häusler will present two site-specific sound works that embrace the temporal nature of “The Funny Pit” and its temporary location in Leipziger Strasse, Berlin. The artists will explore the fragmentation of communication and storytelling through visual and experiential methods.

Danielle Adair lives and works in Los Angeles and is currently a Fellow in Film/Video/New Media at the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart. Adair’s videos have shown in exhibition and screening venues internationally, and with her current body of work, And I Think I Like It., she has performed most recently at the Kiesel, Friedrichshafen, Human Resources, Los Angeles, and Bruno Glint, London.

Natalie Häusler was born in Munich and currently lives in Paris. She received her MFA in 2011 from Bard College/Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, New York and a Diploma with honors and Meisterschueler degree from Braunschweig University of Art. Her work has been shown at PS122 Gallery, New York, Soi Fischer Projects, Vancouver (hosted by Butcher Gallery, Toronto), Chelsea Art Museum, New York, Galerie Warhus Rittershaus, and Cologne and Schnittraum/Lutz Becker, Cologne.

 More information:

Infernoesque Press Release:

This year’s Infernoesque setup invites viewers to muse on the anthropomorphisms of Bataille. The Berliner project room has left its longtime space on Heidestrasse with the aim of utilising a park on Leipziger Strasse for the duration of fourteen weekends.

An exhibition architecture of rough timber planks, designed by the Berlin-based artist Alex Gross under the title Die Lustige Grube (the merry pit), possesses an interior from which the soil has been excavated, revealing bare roots. As provocative as it is unusual, this exhibition space is simultaneously characterised by both presence and retreat. Each exhibition in Die Lustige Grube offers artists and visitors a fresh opportunity to fathom the singular architectural location that is Leipziger Strasse, in the centre of Berlin, and to develop unique perspectives on place and environment.

In close contact with the life of the city, this park is too urban to allow any sort of ‘wasteland romanticism’. The exhibition architecture, itself a mixture between modernist petrol station and Hieronymus Bosch’s ‘Tree Man’, is towered over by the colourful highrise flats at Leipziger Strasse 40 and 41. Hence the Grube, or pit, is more a depiction of an unexpected detour leading away from the evolutionary path towards the skyscraper. Works shown here cannot avoid asserting themselves within the context of these surrounding structures. The special appeal of the project, however, lies not only in its architectural dialogue, but also in its direct contact with people who live in the vicinity, by whom the project, together with the Wohnungsbaugesellschaft Mitte (Mitte Housing Association) WBM, is supported. This exhibition architecture prepares a stage for the inhabitants of this area.

With its summer programme, Infernoesque furthers its undeviating efforts to make alternative spaces available for artistic experiments that function as aesthetic antipoles to the conventional white cube. The Infernoesque team – Sonja Gerdes, Johannes Weiss, Marius Schmidt, Alex Gross and Anna Mields – has invited international artists to activate dialogue between people and architectures.

The exhibitions will take place during a total of fourteen events from June to September 2013 on Friday and Saturday at Leipziger Strasse 40. For the opening of Die Lustige Grube on Friday, June 7, 2013, Infernoesque will show the work Starline by the New-York-based artists Kerstin Braetsch and Adele Röder. The programme to follow, which will consist of exhibitions alternated on a weekly basis, has been created by artists and curators from Berlin, London, Glasgow and Los Angeles. As a summary of the curatorial programme, a special edition of the publication project Pascal Richter will follow.

Click for more information on Infernoesque, Berlin.

Radio Break, various locations, Los Angeles (April 2012)

Radio Break—Two Weekends of Artists’ Low-Power Radio Transmissions & Live Performances

April 14–22, 2012

Curated by Gladys-Katherina Hernando, Zachary Kaplan, Sarah Loyer, Ilana Milch, Evelena Ruether, Megan Sallabedra, Jackie von Treskow, Adrienne White, and Emily Wilkerson. USC Roski School of Fine Art’s MA Art and Curatorial Practices in the Public Sphere Program, class of 2012.

Featuring work by: 2 Headed Dog, Elana Mann with ARLA, and the People’s Microphony Camerata, Brandon LaBelle, Vanessa Place, Alyce Santoro, David Schafer, Brendan Threadgill, Lincoln Tobier, Lucy Raven, Pedro Reyes, Arnoldo Vargas, and Richard T. Walker.

Radio Break is an exhibition on the air, presenting a series of twelve artworks conveyed through low-power radio transmissions and live performances. Taking place during two consecutive weekends in locations throughout Los Angeles, Radio Break connects participants with the ambient sounds of the city, inviting them to tune in to its history, noise, narratives, and music. The works presented are at once personal and anonymous and invite investigations into the psychic spaces of the city.

Radio Break takes place via suggested itineraries, each of which activates a different mode of transportation—the Metro, cycling (during CicLaVia), walking, or driving. A way-finding map and interactive website accompany the exhibition and provide details about the projects and their locations.

More information is available on the project website: http://radio-break.com.

Curatorial essay written for Radio Break here: Slow Listening © Gladys-Katherina Hernando

To see images and documentation of the events visit http://www.radio-break.com/category/events/

Signs of Life, Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles (June 2010)

Signs of Life

Emilie Halpern, Lorna MacIntyre, Kris Martin, Lisa Tan, Greg Wilken

Organized by Gladys-Katherina Hernando

Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles


June 26–July 31, 2010

Opening Reception, Saturday, June 26 from 5 to 7pm.

Richard Telles Fine Art presents an exhibition organized by Gladys- Katherina Hernando titled Signs of Life. The show is centered on five artists who explore photography, sculpture and ephemeral materials as representations of our cultural landscape and human experience.

We are collectors of things; artifacts, books, ideas– they are the remnants of human existence. In our society, we experience life not by reading the encyclopedia but through these intermediaries. The increasing speed of information and technology impacts how humans interact with each other and with our recent past. The gathering of objects allows us to retrace our steps, whether in search of something lost, once understood, or the unknown.

The artist selected for this exhibition use discrete methods of art making to generate a pause to this momentum. The work does not seek to hide its sources; instead they retransmit our collective intellectual output in order to subdue the increased amnesia of our history. Inspired by everyday events, meaningful texts, and natural objects, the works are distilled from a mass of information into a focused meditation of formal structures and cultural fragments.

An online component will accompany the exhibition along with a reader that explores the many influences on the artist’s thinking and practice. The website will be accessible the on June 26th, throughout the course of the exhibition, and as a permanent archive at www.SignsofLife10.wordpress.com.

Information on the Artists:

Emilie Halpern- Los Angeles-based Halpern’s evocative work examines seemingly simple treasures and objects with a keen eye for inquiry rooted in human experience. Halpern will exhibit works from a new series of discrete photographs where male and female figures are united by their interactions with natural objects and symbols found in nature.

Lorna MacIntyre- Based in Glasgow, Scotland, Macintyre references the classical arts, fragments of the natural world, alchemy and literature in her elemental approach to sculpture and photography. Her most recent solo exhibition focused on symbolism and the representation of transcendence and transitional states, while experimenting with materials that left physical traces of change.

Kris Martin- Lives in Ghent, Belgium. Martin explores faith and time through the use of drawing, photography, collage, and ready-made objects. His practice invokes a sentiment of melancholy and humor, while transforming the meaning of elements from their original function. The works presented will examine the significance of literature, dwindled down to its finest point and its inevitable ties to society and death.

Lisa Tan- Lives in Brooklyn, NY and Stockholm, Sweden. Tan interprets an expansion and contraction between minor personal histories and wider public histories or contexts.  Much of her work has involved active displacement as a way of studying the relationship between lived experience and representation.

Greg Wilken- A Los Angeles artist working predominantly in photography and film, Wilken uses forgotten historical subject matter of the “things that go missing” as his springboard. The works exist in the format of a portable book and case, as evidence of the collection of each project, shifting the creative act to the looking-for-something as opposed to the making-of-something.

For additional information, please contact info@tellesfineart.com or 323.965.5578.

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 am to 5pm.

Richard Telles Fine Art 
7380 Beverly Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90036
T: 323.965.5578
F: 323.965.5579

www.tellesfineart.com

Light & Wire @ Circus Gallery, Circus Gallery, Los Angeles (2009)

Co-Curated with Jessica Minckley